A girl wearing a right wing T-shirt

The rise of nationalism in Russia

On December 11th 2010, Moscow saw its worst week of ethnic tensions over decades, culminating in mass rioting of football fans, nationalists, and ultra-right skinheads. Many adolescent boys and girls had also latched onto the nationalist wave after the riots. Their hatred towards black people is expressed in music, graffiti and street dancing with slogans like "Russia for Russians", Fuck the Caucasus and 14/88. This worrying trend is blamed on various factors such as an influx of migrant workers from central Asia, Russias perceived humiliation at the hands of the west and subsequently a lack of jobs with no future.The Kremlin's response to the rise of nationalism shows the government's weakness and disorientation. Russian President Dmitry Medvedev appeared on national TV only in a few days after the riots and looking confused, and declared that such actions threaten the stability of the state. Many surveys indicate that more than two thirds of Moscows population side with the nationalists and sympathize with the calls for Moscow for Muscovites. A broad majority of ethnic Russians feel uncomfortable about the fact that their numbers are shrinking while they watch their non-Slavic neighbors flourishing and riots are becoming more anti-government than nationalist.